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Friday, September 1st 2006

Now I Have Nothing To Remember Him By

A fine move in England, as Britons who have let it be known to the state that they are organ donors (i.e. by signing organ donor cards) will now defintley have their organs donated.

If you don’t know, this is not the case in most (if not all) U.S. states. That is why it is extremely important to make your wishes known to your family. And up until this new law it wasn’t the case in the UK.

But, no longer. When it is clear the deceased wanted his organ’s donated there will not be the necessity for consent from the family.

Families will lose the right to block their relatives’ wish to donate their organs under reforms, which come into force on Friday.

Currently families can stop doctors from taking their loved ones’ organs even if they carried a donor card. About one in 10 planned donations is blocked at present.

This is but one consequence of the new law. Apparently, it was actually drawn up in response to some scandals involving the illegal removal of tissues. It balances its removal of next of kin rights by criminalizing the act of removing tissue from the deceased without consent.

A new body, the Human Tissue Authority, will regulate the removal, storage, use and disposal of organs. “People will be reassured that their wishes expressed while they were alive are now more likely to be followed,” said HTA Chief Executive Adrian McNeil.

Basically as a whole it moves to protect the wishes of the deceased themselves. Putting criminal threats to doctors or healthcare providers who remove organs without consent and keeping families from blocking the expressed consent of the deceased to donate organs.

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